Saturday, February 2, 2008

New ACNARGS blog

From Craig Cramer, newsletter editor/webmaster:

To streamline our chapter's communications, this winter I started the ACNARGS blog. If you aren't familiar with them, a blog is simply a website organized chronologically, like a diary. Stop in and take a gander at it: http://acnargs.blogspot.com.

The advantages of the blog include:
  • Instead of waiting until it's time for each issue of the newsletter to come out, information can be posted to the blog continuously.
  • All the information doesn't have to flow through me. Blogging is easy and I can train other chapter members how to post to the blog.
  • You can write comments to blog posts, sharing information and engaging in online 'conversations'.
  • Some items may not make it from the blog to the newsletter due to space considerations.
  • It’s easier to follow links to more information from the blog posts than from the newsletter.
This year, whenever there is a newsletter issue to get out, I will cut and paste appropriate posts from the blog into our regular newsletter format which you will receive attached to an email. But I also plan to include the table of contents in the email with links directly to the blog posts so that you will hopefully get in the habit of visiting the blog directly whenever you need ACNARGS information.

I will do a short demo at our February meeting. Or if you have any questions or would like to learn more about the blog, don't hesitate to contact me: cdcramer@twcny.rr.com.

3 comments:

Craig said...

Just thought I'd leave a comment so that you can see what they look like.

Carol Eichler said...

For anyone checking out the blog, it's real easy to make comments with or without an identity (that's easy to set up too). I'm a newby to this and can testify that it's even kinda fun!

Anonymous said...

Just reread "Hardy Ferns for Rock Gardens". Missing are two Maidenhair ferns: Adiantum venustus, the Himalayan Maidenhair, and A. edatum subpumilum. Also missing is the Rockcap fern, Polypodium virginianum.

Bill Plummer